Monthly Archives

July 2016

SMYS Staff Member of the Week! Nichole Long

By | Nursing | No Comments

Show Me Your Stethoscope Presents

Nichole Long RN. SMYS Ambassador Arizona

How long have you been a nurse and what kind of nursing do you do?
Nichole has been a nurse since 2011. Prior to that she worked in the medical field as a paratrooper medic in the Army in 2001. Today she works in acute care, Med Surg nursing.

What’s your role at SMYS?
Nichole is one of the SMYS Ambassadors in Arizona. She was instrumental in organizing the Arizona State House rally 5/12/16. Not only did Nichole and her team organize the rally their state capital in less than 3 months, they were able to get state legislators, political candidates, and a nurse lawyers to speak at their rally.

In many ways Nichole is a model SMYS ambassador. She and her team took the formula for organizing, improved and implemented it! She was able to pull off a successful event by sheer will, passion and determination! Nurses around the United States saw the SMYS Arizona team take action to advocate for them selves and create pathways for real change to happen! We are all so luck to have Nicole with us!

What is your favorite thing about working at SMYS?
Nichole says her favorite thing about working at SMYS is “seeing the same passion that I have for nursing in other nurses across the nation. The drive to care for people and each other is amazing!” Words from a true NURSE CHAMPION!

Why do you volunteer your time to help SMYS?
“I volunteer my time to help SMYS because I feel the members offer the support that we need to truly put the “care” back in “healthcare”. nichole

What do you want SMYS to be when it is all grown up?
Since SMYS is already involved in advocacy, philanthropy, and unity among members, I would like to see SMYS represented in nursing schools across the country to empower new nurses to use their voice and speak up for change.

You know, Nichole is really on to something here. We do need to pull nursing students into this movement. They should understand the challenges in our profession. More importantly, they should know that a nation of nurses stands behind them when they advocate for their patients and their colleagues.
For our nursing student members, don’t forget to apply for SMYS schollarships here http://www.prweb.com/releases/DailyNurse/SMYS/prweb13402699.htm and here http://www.hirenurses.com/tips-resources/2016/03/20/nursing_scholarships/. Good luck!

When you guys see Nichole Long on the message boards and in the forums, say hello, get to know her! She’s pretty amazing! If you’re interested in hosting an event in your local area she made this awesome video tutorial about how to put your team together. Check it out here https://youtu.be/ksrb2ghpeG0

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SMYS Staff of the week: Jennifer Lombardi Story

By | SMYSStaff, Unity | 3 Comments

 

Jennifer (Story as we call her) has been a nurse (LPN) for 13 years. She has worked in several nursing specialties but most recently has been working in oncology for the past 4 years. She currently works in shirtsmysleukemia research at Massachusetts General. Jennifer has several roles at SMYS including but not limited to moderating the main SMYS group & serving as an SMYS for Change Ambassador for Massachusetts.

What is your favorite thing about working at SMYS?
My Favorite thing about SMYS is the people. I’ve made lots of friends and love seeing everyone come together to support each other. Plus, I love the meme wars!

Why do you volunteer your time to help SMYS?
I volunteer my time because I have seen what this group has accomplished in such a short amount of time and see the potential for what we can become. With these numbers and the passionate members and staff, there is absolutely nothing we can’t achieve.

What do you want SMYS to be when it is all grown up?
When SMYS is all grown up I would love to see it have a physical location, a group that does so much to help people and to make waves in the medical community. Known for our good works, getting safe staffing legislation passed and tackling the next project.

Jennifer is one of the treasures of the SMYS crew. She is always willing to jump in and lend a hand. For example, at the #NursesTakeDC rally she jumped into action to help get hundreds of pizzas delivered to the rally attendees. She ran the SMYS booth at the Nurse Innovation Hackathon at Northeastern University. She, along with other SMYS staff, picked up Janie from the Airport in DC, and even though they got lost, managed to get her to her destination, eventually. Most importantly, she’s a coffee drinker, and will make sure to help you get your morning dose before any SMYS event kicks off. shirt8

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Treehugger By Kilgore, RN

By | humor, Nursing, Uncategorized | No Comments

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Every nurse encounters poop. Like, lots of poop. And this, friends, is a poop story.

Pt. was admitted to the Medical ICU for a series of TIA’s; he had already suffered multiple strokes before this admission, and resided in an assisted living home. He was not as well tended as he should have been there, and that trend followed him here. I normally work in the CVU, but because our unit was short on patients (“low census,” for the uninitiated), I “floated” to MICU and took care of Patient. I took him from Odessa, another CVU nurse, who had received him from Jimmy, my partner in crime. In his entire admission, he had not once been cared for by any of the native nurses. My guess is that the charge nurse, Heidi, didn’t think we were up to the usual medical disasters present on the MICU (her words to me: “Well, we don’t want to give you anything too hard.” Wow, you’re right, I’m probably stupid. Fuck you too, lady.) Hence, Patient was being handed to the floats because he wasn’t challenging or sexy enough. Whatever. For once, I knew I would get a lunch.

We had a good day, and yes, it was easy to care for him; I felt badly for the regular staff on the unit because they were working unbelievably hard compared to what I was doing. Toward the end of the shift, I received news that Patient was being returned to his facility. I went in to share the news with him that everyone thought he was stable enough to go home. Before I got a single word out, he stared at me dolefully and moaned, “You know, my stomach is just killing me.” I immediately stopped and gave his belly a listen, then pushed on it a bit…damn. It was kind of firm, more so than when I had assessed him previously. I asked him if he felt like he needed to poop, and if he had been passing gas lately. He was bed-bound, so I wasn’t too surprised that no one knew the last time the poor bastard had gotten the pleasure of unloading.

I took a deep breath. Of course, it was 1800, and I was supposed to be preparing his transfer paperwork. But damn it, a man’s gotta move the mail sometimes. Apparently, 1800 with transport en route was that time.

I explained disimpaction to him. He didn’t care, he just said “please, just help me.”

Gloves. A heavy duty chuck (which is a really absorbent pad…sort of a “pee pee pad” for people). Wipes. Surgilube. A garbage can. It was on.

I asked him to try one more time to push on his own. I may be the Brown Queen, but that doesn’t mean I want to wedge my fingers in anyone’s ass. He was unsuccessful, grunting and sweating and groaning all the way.

GO TIME!

I started working on the dry matter. Some poop made its way. Then…he started pushing again.

We had busted the dam.

I had never seen anything like it, and I haven’t since. It was HUGE. The size of a small baby. I am not exaggerating. I was immediately angry that no one at his home had even noticed that he hadn’t notably crapped recently, but relieved I caught it…so to speak. Technically, it had actually landed on the chuck. At least there was no cord to cut.

Another nurse had noticed at this point that I hadn’t been out of the room for a while and came to check on me. Her head popped around the privacy curtain. “Are you okay in here?”, she asked. “Yeah, I’m fine, but I could use a hand getting my friend here cleaned up.” My voice was calm, but I was jerking my head back to urge her to LOOKIT THIS GIANT DOOKER, OMG. She came around the bed to where I was, frowning…and then she saw. Her eyes got big, but in her best nursing voice: “Sure, I’d love to help you. Are you doing all right, sir?”

Honestly, we sound like airline stewardesses in turbulence.
More coffee? SkyMall magazine? A bit of the Finger?
It’s just a little turbulence. We only dropped a few dozen feet.
You only shit a cinder block. It’s fine now.

God. Patient was so happy. I’d swear his grips even improved on his weaker, affected side. He said “thank you so much” at least four times in the time it took me to clean up and wash my hands.

After we got Patient situated, did I do my paperwork? Did I call report to his home? Nope. I texted Jimmy.

“didn’t you have the guy in room X yest?”
“yep, why? is he ok?”
“i just disimpacted him”, then
“omfg, it was like a sequoia log”

Patient went home a new man.

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